Tag: injury rehabilitation

Dealing with Plantar Fasciitis
September 11, 2014 Legs and Feet,Managing Common Conditions Brian Fulton

  Plantar Fasciitis The plantar fascia, as seen above, is the flat band ligament that connects your heel bone to your toes. It supports the arch of your foot. If your plantar fascia is subject to stress, it can become inflamed. (This is where the ‘itis’ comes in.) The inflammation typically begins where the fascia
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Registered Massage Therapy versus Massage
February 2, 2013 Massage Brian Fulton

Is there a difference between massage and massage therapy?   What does the word massage mean to you? Like any word, it can mean many different things to many different people. Touch therapy is documented as far back as 2000 B.C., but undoubtedly predates writing and maybe even language. The actual word massage has French
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Simple, Safe Exercises For Your Back
February 6, 2012 Back and Pelvis,Exercise,Managing Common Conditions,Rehabilitation Brian Fulton

  A term that you may have heard used around fitness is core strength. However, when you try to find out exactly which muscles are the core muscles, you find that everybody has a different list. Suffice it to say that they are generally the deeper muscles in the torso and hips rather than the
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Treating and Avoiding Shin Splints
February 6, 2012 Exercise,Injury Prevention,Legs and Feet,Managing Common Conditions,Rehabilitation Brian Fulton

  One common running injury is  “shin splints”, a phrase that really tells you nothing.  As with most body pain, inflammation is involved and needs to be minimized.  In the case of shin splints, inflammation is occurring in a muscle compartment that has little room for expansion, and it is occurring right where your muscle
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Stretching Basics
February 1, 2012 Healthy Lifestyle,Stretching Brian Fulton

101 Reasons to Stretch . . (okay maybe twelve) More than 40% of our body mass is skeletal muscle, the muscle type that is under our conscious control and that is responsible for body movement. Fortunately, muscle is prone to very few diseases, but it is prone to dysfunction. Dysfunction is very common, but readily preventable,
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